January 2018 spectra 119 - Equality of opportunity

Artikel in dieser Ausgabe

08.01.2018

Social disadvantage leads to unequal health opportunities

Health equity. Our health system is based on the fundamental principle of openness and solidarity: it must do justice to the needs of all groups in the population, irrespective of their language, origin, social status and level of education. This means that often a special effort must be made to ensure that the disadvantaged are also provided with basic health-care as well as health promotion and prevention resources. more

08.01.2018

At first hand

Editorial. The Swiss population has a long life expectancy and generally enjoys good health. The strengths of our health system include the high quality of care and the wide range of benefi ts covered by the statutory health insurance in this country. Yet there are some distinct differences in the health of various groups within the population – differences that we can infl uence and therefore do not want to accept as a matter of course. Our strategies should make a contribution to mitigating these differences so that we reach out even to the weakest members of society. more

08.01.2018

"Diversity is an enrichment and a growing reality."

Interview with Patrick Bodenmann. Equality of opportunity in hospitals does not mean providing a "one size fi ts all" treatment but one tailored to a patient's individual requirements, i.e. treatment that meets the needs of the particular health problem and the particular patient. Patrick Bodenmann is familiar with this important topic, both from a theoretical and practical point of view: as university professor, as co-founder of the Swiss Hospitals for Equity, and as head of a polyclinic at the University Hospital Lausanne. more

08.01.2018

Understanding and being understood – traumatized refugees and working with intercultural interpreters

Forum. It is estimated that currently between 40 and 50 per cent of all asylum seekers and refugees from war zones and crisis regions are suffering from trauma-related illnesses. Many of them have repeatedly experienced traumatic situations as a result of war, torture and life-threatening escapes. Once in Switzerland they are confronted with a new culture and aspects of residency and social law that will have a fundamental impact on their lives for years to come. more